Leaked memo: Trump administration authorized domestic surveillance of protests to protect statues | Salon.com

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It likewise provides legal assistance on the “expanded intelligence activities needed to alleviate the considerable threat to homeland security” posed by threats to statues.
“If we get the same kind of intelligence in other locations about risks to other centers or officers, we would react the very same way. The document states the legal guidance is “particular to expanded intelligence activities necessary to alleviate the considerable hazard to homeland security articulated in the presidents executive order of June 26, 2020. The document specifies that this intelligence collection is licensed in response to hazards of violence and risks to damage federal government facilities. A ” threat to MMS means the infliction of any damage adequate to impede the function or function of the MMS,” the memo continues.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) authorized domestic security to identify dangers versus monuments and statues in response to President Donald Trumps executive order targeting vandalism against federal memorials, according to a department memo obtained by Lawfare.
It also provides legal guidance on the “broadened intelligence activities essential to alleviate the considerable danger to homeland security” posed by risks to statues.
Senior DHS official Ken Cuccinelli appeared to describe intelligence event on protests during a Monday interview with CNN.
” We got intelligence about prepared attacks on federal centers,” he stated in response to concerns about the administrations controversial implementation of federal authorities to Portland. “If we get the exact same type of intelligence in other locations about risks to other facilities or officers, we would react the very same method.” Advertisement: propervideotag.push( function() ); But the memo “makes clear that the licensed intelligence activity covers significantly more than just prepared attacks on federal personnel or facilities,” composed Benjamin Wittes, a Lawfare editor, and Steve Vladeck, a nationwide security law professional at the University of Texas School of Law. “It appears to likewise include planned vandalism of Confederate (and other historical) monuments and statues, whether federally owned or not.”
The document offers legal guidance to personnel detailing what kind of intelligence collection is suitable. The document was provided after Trump signed an executive order on June 26 reasserting that the federal government would prosecute “anybody or any entity that destroys, damages, vandalizes or desecrates a monument, memorial or statue within the United States or otherwise vandalizes government property.”
The order directed Attorney General William Barr to work with local law enforcement to pursue examinations and prosecutions of alleged monument and statue vandals “regardless of whether such structures are positioned on federal property.
The document says the legal guidance is “specific to broadened intelligence activities needed to mitigate the considerable danger to homeland security articulated in the presidents executive order of June 26, 2020.
” I&A workers are not allowed to take part in electronic monitoring or unconsented physical searches,” it includes. “Use of these techniques within the United States will be coordinated with the Federal Bureau of Investigation.”.
The file states that this intelligence collection is licensed in action to risks of violence and threats to harm federal government facilities.
The memo clarifies that the monitoring can not be utilized “for the sole purpose of monitoring activities safeguarded by the First Amendment or the lawful workout of other constitutional or legal rights, or for the purpose of straining or suppressing criticism or dissent.” Authorities should “develop reasonable belief” that the intelligence collection supports one of the stated missions.
A ” risk to MMS means the infliction of any damage adequate to restrain the function or function of the MMS,” the memo continues.
The file goes on to include that any information collected which does not associate with one of the stated objectives need to be purged within 180 days. Details maintained by the company can be disseminated to other federal, state and regional law enforcement in advance of any of the stated objectives.
The memo drew concerns from legal specialists.
” It is unpersuasive, because it needs to be obvious that vandalism and other damage to monoliths, even federal monuments, does not threaten the security of the homeland to any greater extent than most residential or commercial property criminal offenses,” Wittes and Vladeck composed. “The facility is worrying, due to the fact that it utilizes the cover of small residential or commercial property damage, whether to federal residential or commercial property or otherwise, to justify intelligence gathering against normal Americans– the majority of whom have absolutely nothing to do with the underlying property damage, and much of whom are engaged in the most American of activities: quietly objecting their federal government.”.
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