Texas’ count of coronavirus deaths jumps 12% after officials change the way they tally COVID-19 fatalities

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Texas law requires death certificates to be submitted within 10 days.

Hispanic Texans are overrepresented in the states updated death count, making up 47% of deaths, according to health officials, while they comprise about 40% of the states population. White Texans represent 35% of deaths while Black Texans comprise 14% of deaths. Prior to Monday, the states ethnic and racial breakdown of deaths had big spaces, with up to 18% of deaths last month taped as “unidentified.”.

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Public health professionals have said for months that the states main death toll is an undercount. State health officials stated Monday that the policy change would enhance the accuracy and timeliness of their information.

Hispanic Texans are overrepresented in the states upgraded casualty count, making up 47% of deaths, according to health authorities, while they make up about 40% of the states population. White Texans account for 35% of deaths while Black Texans make up 14% of deaths. Before Monday, the states ethnic and racial breakdown of deaths had large gaps, with up to 18% of deaths last month tape-recorded as “unidentified.”.

Males are more most likely to have actually passed away from the coronavirus, according to the updated state figures, comprising 60% of deaths. And about 180 deaths, or 3% of the total, occurred among Texans more youthful than 40. About 2,000 people who died were 80 or older, making up the biggest age bracket of COVID-19 deaths.

The first death connected to the coronavirus in Texas occurred March 16 in Matagorda County. Since Sunday, state officials stated about 5,030 people who tested positive for the virus had passed away. With Mondays upgrade, the brand-new figure is roughly 5,700.

It took 53 days to get from the first death to 1,000 deaths and 39 days to get from 1,000 to 2,000 deaths. On July 10, the state went beyond 3,000 deaths– 24 days after 2,000 deaths were reported.

After months of undercounting coronavirus deaths, Texas formal tally of COVID-19 deaths grew by more than 600 on Monday after state health authorities changed their method of reporting.

It took 53 days to get from the first death to 1,000 deaths and 39 days to get from 1,000 to 2,000 deaths. On July 10, the state went beyond 3,000 deaths– 24 days after 2,000 deaths were reported.

While Texas continues to report everyday deaths in the triple digits, the number of brand-new everyday cases seem to be stabilizing. In the past week alone, state data appears to reveal brand-new everyday infections leveling off, albeit at nearly record highs.

Nurses examine the X-rays of coronavirus clients in the COVID-19 unit at the DHR University Hospital in Edinburg. Miguel Gutierrez Jr./ The Texas Tribune

” This technique does not include deaths of people who had COVID-19 however passed away of an unassociated cause,” the Texas Department of State Health Services said in a press release.

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The state tape-recorded its biggest number of day-to-day new cases July 15, at 10,791. On Sunday, that number was 5,810.

The modified count shows that more than 12% of the states death tally was unreported by state health officials prior to Monday.

Indiana likewise under-reported coronavirus deaths – more details here.

The Texas Department of State Health Services is now counting deaths marked on death certificates as brought on by COVID-19. Previously, the state depended on regional and local public health departments to validate and report deaths.